Wednesday, April 3, 2013

Costs of Iraq more than money


Sadly, your weekly sentiment vote on whether the Iraq War was worth your $2 trillion estimated cost showed how Americans view most of the world’s tragedies: by putting a dollar value on the outcome as opposed to measuring the long-range effects on people, families and our national standing in the world of tomorrow.

Most respondents likely didn’t think beyond the money, which in itself is most probably only 50 percent or less of the actual long-term cost of Bush’s blunder.  This country has buried more than 4,500 dead, hospitalized at least 44,000 severely injured and will pay forever for the tens of thousands of veterans suffering from PTSD and severe brain injuries.  And let’s not forget the 125,000 documented Iraqi dead, untold wounded and the couple million refugees the war created.

I’ve wondered if we should feel good that 85 percent voted no, that it wasn’t worth the cost.  Even that percentage still leaves some real creepy souls among us to hurry us on down the road we’ve chosen.

And as far as the leadership who opened up this sad chapter of American history—Bush, Cheney, Rumsfeld, Faith, Perle, Wolfowitz, Powell, Rice and others—many believe that in another life there will be a special and final accounting for spirits of their ilk.

In the meantime, the vast majority of the herd will be paying on a daily basis for the rest of their lives, simply trying to survive and quietly longing for what could have been while we were controlled by a world gone mad. Would you care for an order of “freedom fries” with that?

Dennis Wright

Bellevue




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